Monthly Bulletin – Housing

KCR Monthly Bulletin – Table of Contents

Housing


Government of B.C. – Rental Housing Task Force

Share your ideas on how we can ensure safe, secure and affordable rental housing in B.C.

Premier John Horgan has appointed a Rental Housing Task Force that will advise on how to improve security and fairness for renters and rental housing providers throughout the province.

The task force is lead by Vancouver-West End MLA Spencer Chandra Herbert, who serves as the Premier’s Advisor on Residential Tenancy. Herbert will work alongside MLAs Adam Olsen and Ronna-Rae Leonard, who will make up the remaining two positions on the three-member task force.

The Rental Housing Task Force wants to better understand what further changes may be needed to modernize B.C.’s tenancy laws. Their work includes:
  • Talking to the public, rental housing providers, renters and stakeholders on their views and experiences with current tenancy laws and processes;
  • Speaking with Manufactured home park tenants, and owners about improvements to Manufactured Home Park legislation;
  • Identifying options to improve security and fairness for both renters and rental housing providers, while addressing the challenges of affordability;
  • A review of the existing laws and how they apply to different housing situations; and
  • A review of innovative approaches in other jurisdictions.

The task force will report findings and make recommendations to Premier Horgan and Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing Selina Robinson in fall 2018.

The public engagement will include meetings with organizations, community meetings in 10 locations, submissions from organizations, and an online discussion that will be open until July 6 at 4:00 pm.

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-Source: Twitter, Government of BC, 31 May 2018

Distinct Pathways of Older Adults into Homelessness

Financial supports for low-income Canadians are much more comprehensive for older adults than for those supported through general social assistance. In Ontario, for example, between OAS, GIS, GAINS, CPP, the GST/HST credit, and the Ontario Trillium Benefit, less than 5% of seniors live below the Low Income Cut Off (LICO). However, in spite of these more comprehensive income supports, older adults are still at risk of experiencing housing loss.

Victoria Burns and Tamara Sussman sought to understand pathways into homelessness for older adults in Montreal, Quebec. They interviewed 15 men and women currently residing in emergency shelters. Through a grounded theory analysis, they discovered two distinct pathways into homelessness for older adults: Gradual versus Rapid.

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-Source: Newsletter, Homeless Hub, 31 May 2018

Correlates of Treatment Readiness Among Formerly Incarcerated Homeless Women

Treatment readiness is a key predictor of drug treatment completion, rearrest, and recidivism during community reentry; however, limited data exist among homeless female offenders (HFOs). The purpose of this study was to present baseline data from a randomized controlled trial of 130 HFOs who had been released from jail or prison. Over half (60.8%) of HFOs had a treatment readiness score of ≥40 (n = 79, mean [μ] = 40.2, SD = 8.72). Bivariate analyses revealed that methamphetamine use, psychological well-being, and high emotional support were positively associated with treatment readiness. On the contrary, depressive symptomatology and depression/anxiety scores were negatively associated with the treatment readiness score. Multiple linear regression revealed that depressive symptomatology was negatively associated with treatment readiness (β = −0.377, p = .001). Further analyses revealed that the effect of emotional support on treatment readiness was mediated by depressive symptomatology.

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-Source: Newsletter, Homeless Hub, 31 May 2018

New Resource: Toolkit for Intensive Case Management in Canada

For those using a Case Management Program for the Housing First Model, there is a new toolkit available from the Homelessness Partnering Strategy on the Community Workspace on Homelessness! It’s also available in French.

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-Source: Newsletter, Homeless Hub, 31 May 2018

2018 Canadian Rental Housing Index

Nearly half of Canadian renter households are spending more than the recommended 30 per cent of their income on housing while nearly one in five are spending more than 50 per cent of their income on housing, putting a growing number of families and individuals at a crisis level of spending and at risk of homelessness.

The information comes from the 2018 Canadian Rental Housing Index, a comprehensive database of rental housing statistics released today by a national partnership of housing associations, credit unions, and municipal associations, developed using the latest census data from Statistics Canada.

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-Source: Newsletter, Homeless Hub, 24 May 2018

Housing in Canada’s Big Cities

In March 2017, The City of Calgary published Housing in Calgary: An Inventory of Housing Supply, 2015/2016, providing comprehensive information on Calgary’s housing supply, covering the entire spectrum of housing in Calgary, from emergency shelter spaces to market homeownership. Through this report, a more complete picture of the entire housing system in Calgary became visible, enabling a broader understanding of housing supply trends, gaps and implications and specifically, the current state of the affordable housing segment. This report is intended to compliment the 2017 Housing in Calgary report by helping to understand in what ways Calgary’s housing supply and affordability compare to other big cities, the possible reasons why it is different, and what municipal tools are currently being used to impact supply and affordability in Canada’s largest cities.

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-Source: Newsletter, Homeless Hub, 24 May 2018

What do Homeless Transition-age Youth Want from Housing Interventions?

Housing-led interventions have become recognized as a best practice for addressing homelessness among adults, yet whether and how they apply to transition-age youth (TAY) is less clear. The purpose of the present study is to expand on a burgeoning literature that has provided marginalized TAY an opportunity to voice their perspectives on housing-led program design. The goal of the study it to build on the existing literature that has predominantly used individual qualitative interviewing by using a focus group methodology in which group interaction can generate data and insights that may not emerge in individual interviews. Focus groups (n = 4) were conducted with 18 youth.

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-Source: Newsletter, Homeless Hub, 24 May 2018

Why Real-Time Data is the Foundation for Ending Homelessness

We can’t gather the necessary information to house our homeless neighbours solely by counting them anonymously once every two years. Solving homelessness requires actionable, real-time, person specific data to ensure the right people get into the right housing at the right time and communities are armed with the data they need to transform their homeless systems.

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-Source: Newsletter, Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness, 11 May 2018

Register today for the 2018 National Conference on Ending Homelessness

Date: November 5-7, 2018
Location: Hamilton Convention Centre, Ontario
Cost: Early Bird $560 / After September 5 $695
Register Now

To support greater participation of people with lived experience of homelessness we’ve introduced a special Lived Experience Participant registration price. People with lived experience of homelessness will be able to register for the conference for an early bird rate of $210 before September 5th or $320 after September 5th. Our goal is to achieve a 15% lived experience participation rate at the conference to ensure the voice of lived experience is part of the conversation on solutions.

-Source: Newsletter, Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness, 11 May 2018

Final Report of the Advisory Committee on Homelessness

The Advisory Committee on Homelessness, chaired by Adam Vaughan, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development (Housing and Urban Affairs), was announced in June 2017. Consisting of 13 members from across the country with varied backgrounds, the Committee has worked diligently since the announcement through conference calls, online collaboration, in-person meetings and attendance at regional roundtables.

Committee members bring a wealth and diversity of experience to the table. Their collective membership spans policy, advocacy and community service provision, and many have been in this field for over 20 years. In addition, 2 members have their own lived experience of homelessness and bring that perspective, and the perspective of their clients living in homelessness, to bear on each discussion.

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-Source: Newsletter, Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness, 18 May 2018

Promising Practices – 12 Case Studies in Supportive Housing for People with Mental Health & Addiction Issues

This resource guide (produced by Addictions and Mental Health Ontario, the Canadian Mental Health Association, and the Wellesley Institute) documents and reviews 12 examples of promising practices of housing-related supports for people with mental health and addiction issues.

The examples are all from Ontario but are replicable and/or adaptable examples of supportive housing practices that can be applied anywhere in Canada. And while each case study has a distinct approach, there are common themes across these twelve specific examples that can guide new interventions elsewhere. It also includes additional resources that can be borrowed and modified for use in other supportive housing programs.

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-Source: Newsletter, The Federation of Community Social Services of BC, 24 May 2018
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